Writing for Assessment


English Language Arts Grade 6 The Writing Process
Students learn and practice strategies for responding to writing tasks during assessment. First they preview and read a fable, then they learn PAST strategy to analyze a prompt about the fable, and they are directed through a shortened writing process to compose an assessment essay. Then they repeat the process independently for a second passage.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Teacher Pack

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Here are the teacher pack items for Writing for Assessment:

Preview - Scene 1
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Overview

In this experience, students learn and practice strategies for responding to writing tasks during assessment. First they preview and read a fable, then they learn PAST strategy to analyze the prompt, and they are directed through a shortened writing process to compose an assessment essay. Then they repeat the process independently for a second passage.

At the end of the experience, students will self-evaluate their work based on a rubric. You may review the rubric with them at any point during this experience.

Objectives

  • Read actively to determine the author’s message and supporting details.
  • Analyze a writing prompt to determine the requirements of the task.
  • Apply the steps of the writing process to compose a response that adequately addresses the writing task.

Duration

Two class periods.

Vocabulary Words Used in “Paul Revere’s Ride”

  • belfry: bell tower
  • muffled: prevent sound
  • moorings: anchoring of the ship
  • barrack: soldiers accommodations
  • grenadiers: soldier armed with grenades
  • sentinels: soldier whose job is to keep watch
  • impetuous: violent; also: done quickly without thought or care
  • girth: measure around something


Throughout the school year you are asked to “show what you know” by completing an assessment, or test, that asks you to read a passage and respond to what you read. In this experience you will learn and practice strategies that you can use when you are asked to respond to a writing task on a test. You will analyze a writing prompt to figure out what the question is asking you. Using a shortened version of the writing process, you will then plan and write a response for the writing task, knowing that there is a time limit.

Objectives

  • Read actively to determine the author’s message and supporting details.
  • Analyze a writing prompt to determine the requirements of the task.
  • Apply the steps of the writing process to compose a response that adequately addresses the writing task.


Girl taking exam in class

First, take a turn writing a test question. Look at the children’s rhyme:


Jack Sprat could eat no fat

His wife could eat no lean.

So between the two of them

They licked the platter clean.   


Write a test question about “Jack Sprat.” 

Post your answer

The purpose of this activity is to let students “be in control” of a test question. If the questions they write are simplistic, then you can make a few suggestions and move on. If students post any interesting questions, take time to discuss them with the class.

Some sample questions include:

  • What can you learn from Jack Sprat and his wife about collaboration? Cite evidence from the poem to support your analysis.
  • There is a saying that “opposites attract.” Describe two people—real or fictional—who prove the saying true. Make a connection between your example and the poem. 


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The Writing Process Unit.
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