Capitalization and Punctuation


English Language Arts Grade 6 The Writing Process
Students learn and apply the rules for capitalizing abbreviations, initials, acronyms, and organizations. Then they learn comma usage for complex sentences, introductory elements, and transition words and phrases. Finally, they apply what they have learned in original writing.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Capitalization and Punctuation:

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Overview

In this experience, students learn and apply the rules for capitalizing abbreviations, initials, acronyms, and organizations. Then they learn comma usage for complex sentences, introductory elements, and transition words and phrases. Finally, they apply what they have learned in original writing.

Objectives

  • Identify and apply the rules for capitalization of abbreviations, initials, acronyms, and organizations.
  • Identify and apply comma usage in complex sentences, introductory elements, and transition words and phrases.

Duration

One class period.


Using correct capitalization and punctuation helps you communicate your message to your reader. In this experience, you will learn rules for capitalization and punctuation.

Objectives

  • Identify and apply the rules for capitalization of abbreviations, initials, acronyms, and organizations.
  • Identify and apply comma usage in complex sentences, introductory elements, and transition words and phrases.


cartoon of grandmother holding tray of cookies and text: Let’s eat Grandma. Let’s eat, Grandma. Punctuation saves lives.

Ask for a volunteer to explain the difference in the two sentences. In the first sentence, “Grandma” is the object being eaten. In the second sentence, Grandma is the vocative expression being addressed.

If students have trouble coming up with ideas in the activity below, encourage them to use the model of the example above: write a sentence with a person as the object, and then write a vocative statement addressing that same person.


Try to write a sentence that can be punctuated in two ways to give it two separate meanings.

Post your answer

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The Writing Process Unit.
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