Primary and Secondary Sources


ELAR-Grade-5 Inquiry & Research Primary and Secondary Sources
Students learn to differentiate between primary and secondary sources. Next they evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each type of source. Then they conduct a search to identify primary and secondary sources for a given topic. Finally they use the sources they found to write a short informative piece.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

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Here are the teacher pack items for Primary and Secondary Sources:

Preview - Scene 1
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Overview

In this experience, students learn to differentiate between primary and secondary sources. Next they evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each type of source. Then they conduct a search to identify primary and secondary sources for a given topic. Finally they use the sources they found to write a short informative piece.

Students will collaborate in small groups for scene 3 and scene 4.

Objective

  • Distinguish between primary and secondary sources.

Duration

One class period.


When historians do research, they look at many different sources to learn about an event or time period. Some of the sources come from that time period and others were written later about the time period. In this experience, you will learn about these different types of sources.

Objective

  • Distinguish between primary and secondary sources.


Two angry teenage girls on bench

Two of your friends, Jane and Emily, had a fight and are no longer speaking to each other. Jane came to you and told you what the fight was about and why she was in the right. You agree that it sounds like Emily made a bad mistake. Emily told another friend, Jessica, why she was in the right. Jessica took Emily’s side. She told you what Emily said, and it was completely different from what Jane told you.

How do you determine who is right in this situation?


Post the action you think would be most likely to get at the truth regarding your friends’ fight.

Post your answer

Lead a discussion about the responses. Point out that someone who is even one person removed from the information brings his own attitudes, beliefs, and perhaps even faulty processing of the information to bear.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Inquiry & Research Unit.
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