In Your Own Words


ELAR-Grade-5 Inquiry & Research In Your Own Words
Students explore what plagiarism is. Then they learn tips for successful paraphrasing and they practice the skill. Finally, they learn to cite sources and develop a bibliography.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for In Your Own Words:

Preview - Scene 1
Exploros Learnign Experience Scene Navigation


Engage


Overview

In this experience, students explore what plagiarism is. Then they learn tips for successful paraphrasing and they practice the skill. Finally, they learn to cite sources and develop a bibliography.

Students will collaborate in small groups for Scene 3.

Objectives

  • Distinguish between paraphrase and plagiarism.
  • Practice paraphrasing text.
  • Credit others for their work and ideas.

Duration

One to two class periods.


When you write anything from a homework assignment to a formal research paper, you are putting words onto paper (or onto the computer disc). You may be summarizing information you learned in class or synthesizing information you gathered from multiple sources. How do you turn that information into your own words? In this experience, you will learn how to do that.

Objectives

  • Distinguish between paraphrase and plagiarism.
  • Practice paraphrasing text.
  • Credit others for their work and ideas.


Adults standing around a table looking at papers

Media team discussing content for a website


Imagine that you are in charge of a website that runs in-depth articles about arts and culture. You have three writers working for you. They write articles about artists, authors, and new trends.

One writer submitted a profile of a famous artist. The article includes quotes from the artist, but you know the writer was unable to arrange an in-person interview. You ask the writer where the quotes came from and learn they came from another interview published online five years ago. That interview is not mentioned or credited in the article.


Do you post the article on the website? Why or why not?

Post your answer

Note that material from someone else’s work should not be used without credit being given.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Inquiry & Research Unit.
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