The Right to Vote


Civics Citizen Participation and Government The Right to Vote
Students learn about the history of voting rights in the United States, including the various amendments that extended these rights over time. They create a timeline of the significant events in that process. Next they explore voter registration and requirements and explain how voting has evolved since the country’s founding. Finally, students research and create a poster that reflects voting registration requirements for elections in their local and state government.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for The Right to Vote:

Preview - Scene 1
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Overview

In this experience, students learn about the history of voting rights in the United States, including the various amendments that extended these rights over time. They create a timeline of the significant events in that process. Next they explore voter registration and requirements and explain how voting has evolved since the country’s founding. Finally, students research and create a poster that reflects voting registration requirements for elections in their local and state government.

Objectives

  • Describe the history of voting rights in the United States.
  • Explain the impact of several amendments on the participation of minority groups and women.
  • Identify the requirements to vote in national, state, and local governments.


You probably hear about elections most from ads on TV or radio, signs in people’s yards, and conversations between adults. Sometimes you might not want to hear any more about elections. But if nobody voted, what would happen? How else would people’s voices be heard? In this experience you are going to learn more about the right to vote—and how people got it.

Objectives

  • Describe the history of voting rights in the United States.
  • Explain the impact of several amendments on the participation of minority groups and women.
  • Identify the requirements to vote in national, state, and local governments.




Voting is a big part of civic life in the United States. The U.S. government is a democracy, which means “rule by the people.” Voting is an important way for Americans to participate in ruling. To learn how this works, begin by watching Voting Rights.


What did you learn in the video that surprised you?



Discuss student responses. Students may be surprised at how limited voting rights were until recently. Invite students to turn their surprises into guiding questions for this experience. 


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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