Forming Public Opinion


Civics Citizen Participation and Government Forming Public Opinion
Students are introduced to what public opinion is. Then they learn how it is measured and what role it plays in politics. Finally, students analyze a public opinion poll and explain their findings.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for Forming Public Opinion:

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Overview

In this experience, students are introduced to what public opinion is. Then they learn how it is measured and what role it plays in politics. Finally, students analyze a public opinion poll and explain their findings.

Objectives

  • Define public opinion.
  • Explain how public opinion is measured.


You know what it means to have an opinion about something. You probably prefer one type of cookie to another. Or you may have an opinion about the best kind of fiction to read. That’s called a personal opinion. So what is public opinion, and what does it have to do with civics and government? You’ll find out in this experience.

Objectives

  • Define public opinion.
  • Explain how public opinion is measured.




Look at the image of a poster from the 1940s. Read the text on it. What do you think this poster was trying to say?

Post your answer

Discuss student responses. Some students will recognize that the poster is explaining that what happens in national policy is influenced by the voice of the people—their public opinion. It is encouraging people to voice what they think in order to keep America free.

There is probably terminology that they do not understand; for example: public opinion and national policy. Tell them that they will learn more in this experience.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Citizen Participation and Government Unit.
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