Literary Devices


ELAR-Grade-5 Author's Craft Literary Devices
Students learn what a stereotype is and how authors use stereotyping. Then, they read a tall tale to analyze hyperbole and write their own examples. Next, they examine anecdotes. Finally, they write a brief passage containing an anecdote and hyperbole.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

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Here are the teacher pack items for Literary Devices:

Preview - Scene 1
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Overview

In this experience, students learn what a stereotype is and how authors use stereotyping. Then, they read a tall tale to analyze hyperbole and write their own examples. Next, they examine anecdotes. Finally, they write a brief passage containing an anecdote and hyperbole.

Students will collaborate in small groups for scene 2 and 3.

Students may need help pronouncing the word hyperbole (hy-PER-bo-lee).

Objectives

  • Recognize stereotyping, hyperbole, and anecdotes.
  • Explain the use of stereotyping, hyperbole, and anecdotes.
  • Compose texts containing an anecdote and hyperbole.

Duration

Two class periods.


Authors try to use words in special ways to help readers see things in a different way. Literary devices are the tools that they use to do this. You may be familiar with some literary devices, such as figurative language, imagery, and sound devices. In this experience, you will learn about three more literary devices: stereotyping, hyperbole, and anecdotes.

Objectives

  • Recognize stereotyping, hyperbole, and anecdotes.
  • Explain the use of stereotyping, hyperbole, and anecdotes.
  • Compose texts containing an anecdote and hyperbole.


teenage girl with braces lying on bed

What words come to mind when you look at the picture above? To list more than one, separate them with a comma, like this: tall, short

Post your answer

group of Asian-looking teenagers sitting on bench, looking at computers

What words come to mind when you look at this second picture?

Post your answer

Broad, over-simplified ideas about groups of people are called stereotypes. When stereotypes affect people’s attitudes, they may be judging others unfairly because of what prior experiences have told them. For example, when you hear the word jock, you may think of someone who is good at sports. Do you also make a judgment about what kind of student this person is? Whether she is a nice person? When I say someone is a brain, what kind of athlete do you think she is?


Divide students into their small groups for the next two scenes.

When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.


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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Author's Craft Unit.
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