Author’s Voice


ELAR-Grade-5 Author's Craft Author’s Voice
Students learn about author’s voice and how authors choose words to develop a unique style. Next, they read a variety of texts and identify the voice of the text. Then, students write their own stories and work on their voices as writers.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for Author’s Voice:

Preview - Scene 1
Exploros Learnign Experience Scene Navigation


Engage


Overview

In this experience, students learn about author’s voice and how authors choose words to develop a unique style. Next, they read a variety of texts and identify the voice of the text. Then, students write their own stories and work on their voices as writers.

Objectives

  • Define voice in text.
  • Discuss how an author creates voice in a text.
  • Compose a text that expresses a voice.

Duration

Two class periods. You may choose to have the students read the wolf’s version of Little Red Riding Hood before beginning the experience.

Vocabulary Words Used in the “Little Red Riding Hood”

  • nemesis: enemy
  • stature: build, height
  • villainous: wicked


People can experience lots of different emotions; anger, sadness, happiness. These emotions are expressed through actions, the faces people make, or through body language. Authors try to do the same thing when they write. They give their characters and stories personalities. Each author’s unique style is called voice. In this experience, you will learn how authors choose their words to develop their voice.

Objectives

  • Define voice in text.
  • Discuss how an author creates voice in a text.
  • Compose a text that expresses a voice.


boy in bathing suit jumping in sand dune

You may have heard the saying, “A picture tells a thousand words.” Look at the picture. What do you think the boy is thinking or would be saying? Use your imagination. 



Most students will likely recognize that the boy is happy or excited to be in the sand.


It is easy for us to look at a picture and identify people’s feelings. We can do the same thing when we are reading. Read the following text. 


I sat in bed, just waiting for the alarm to go off, but pleading with the alarm gods to have time stop. When the alarm starts beeping that awful ear-piercing screech, I know that the day is actually going to happen.

EEE-EEE-EEE-EEE

I toss the covers back, roll out of bed, and slink to the bathroom. I look at the boy in the mirror and I can’t believe he is looking back at me like that.

“What?” I say to him. “You think you would have done a better job if Sasha Gibson asked you to dance? You think you have better moves?”

I feel nauseous just thinking about it! I practiced that move for weeks! How was I supposed to know that Dylan had spilled his drink right in the middle of the gym floor? I spun around, trying to do a complete 360, and landed -SMACK- on the hard gym floor with a bloody nose.

Sasha Gibson would never, ever talk to me again. 


Use the Internet to find an image that matches the feeling—or mood—in the text.


Review the students’ posts and discuss why they chose the images that they did. Ask them to make connections between specific words and phrases in the passage and the images that they chose.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

End of Preview
The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Author's Craft Unit.
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