Point of View


ELAR-Grade-4 Literary Genres Point of View
Students look at a photo that shows different family members’ points of view of one event. Then, they learn to identify first-person and third-person points of view. Next, they read two versions of a passage differing in point of view and explain their responses to them. Finally, they write two different versions of the same one-paragraph story, using different points of view.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Point of View:

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Overview

In this experience, students look at a photo that shows different family members’ points of view of one event. Then, they learn to identify first-person and third-person points of view. Next, they read two versions of a passage differing in point of view and explain their responses to them. Finally, they write two different versions of the same one-paragraph story, using different points of view.

Objectives

  • Recognize the point of view in a text.
  • Explain the use of first- and third-person point of view.

Duration

One class period.

Vocabulary Words Used in Passage 1

  • shelter: place to stay or hide
  • seeped: leaked slowly
  • ordinary: not strange or unusual

Vocabulary Words Used in Passage 2

  • shivered: shook rapidly, such as from cold or fear
  • distance: (1) how far away something is; (2) an area that is far away
  • unaware: not knowing
  • invisible: not seen; unable to be seen
  • stumbled: fell by accident
  • mystery: something that is not understood


When you look through the window at the world outside, you have a point of view. You are seeing the world from a certain spot and a certain angle. Every story also has a point of view. In this experience, you will learn what that means.

Objectives

  • Recognize the point of view in a text.
  • Explain the use of first- and third-person point of view.


Silhouette of the backs of three family members looking at a solar eclipse

Look at the photo. It shows a family watching an eclipse of the sun. There’s a brother on the left, a younger sister in the middle, and the mother on the right. Each of them has his or her own point of view. It isn’t just that each of them is sitting in a slightly different place. Each of them has his or her own thoughts and feelings about the eclipse.

There’s a fourth point of view in the photo, too. Can you guess what it is? It is your point of view. You’re looking at the eclipse. You’re looking at the family from behind.


Choose one of those four points of view. Write briefly about what that point of view is. What is the person seeing, thinking, and feeling?

Post your answer

Lead a discussion in which students compare and contrast the points of view they have described. For each of the four characters (including themselves as observers), compare different students’ descriptions of the same character’s point of view.

Then have students imagine that each of the characters is telling the story of looking at the eclipse. Though the facts would be much the same, each story would be different in its words, ideas, and feelings. Tell students they will learn how a difference in point of view affects a fictional story.


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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Literary Genres Unit.
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