Analyzing Characters


ELAR-Grade-4 Literary Genres Analyzing Characters
Students read an Aesop fable and identify the interactions and changes in the characters. Then, they read an Eskimo folktale and explain how character interactions and changes relate to each other. Finally, they choose a fable or folktale and demonstrate their knowledge by analyzing character interactions and changes.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Teacher Pack

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Here are the teacher pack items for Analyzing Characters:

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Overview

In this experience, students read an Aesop fable and identify the interactions and changes in the characters. Then, they read an Eskimo folktale and explain how character interactions and changes relate to each other. Finally, they choose a fable or folktale and demonstrate their knowledge by analyzing character interactions and changes.

Objectives

  • Describe how characters interact in a story.
  • Explain how characters change in a story.

Duration

One or two class periods. You may assign students the story “The Woman Who Had a Bear as a Foster-Son” (provided in the Student Pack) to read at home before beginning the experience.

Vocabulary Words Used in “The Woman Who Had a Bear as a Foster-Son”

  • blubber: a thick layer of fat
  • thaw: melt, unfreeze
  • braided: tied in woven strips
  • grieve: express sadness about a loss; mourn
  • mourned: expressed sadness about a loss; grieved
  • muzzle: nose, mouth, and jaws of an animal


grandmother, mother, and granddaughter side by side

Three generations: Grandmother, Mother, and Daughter


People change! You’ve changed a lot since the early grades of school. Some of those changes may have begun when you interacted with other people. For example, you may have learned something from a friend or an adult. That experience may have changed the way you saw yourself or others.


Describe a time in your life when you changed. What did the change have to do with other people? 

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Lead in to the experience by telling students that the ways characters interact and change in good stories are like the ways people interact and change in real life.


Like real people, the people in a story—the characters—interact with each other. In addition, characters may change over the course of a story. You’ll learn about those interactions and changes in this experience.

Objectives

  • Describe how characters interact in a story.
  • Explain how characters change in a story.


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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Literary Genres Unit.
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