The Freedoms in the First Amendment


Civics Foundations of American Government The Freedoms in the First Amendment
Students are introduced to the First Amendment by considering the rules that apply to their own online expression. Then they explore the five freedoms stated in the First Amendment. Next, students work in small groups to research and report on one of the five freedoms. Finally, students return to the issue of online expression and consider if and when freedom of speech can go too far.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for The Freedoms in the First Amendment:

Preview - Scene 1
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Overview

In this experience, students are introduced to the First Amendment by considering the rules that apply to their own online expression. Then they explore the five freedoms stated in the First Amendment. Next, students work in small groups to research and report on one of the five freedoms. Finally, students return to the issue of online expression and consider if and when freedom of speech can go too far.

Students will work in small groups in scene 3.

Objectives:

  • Identify the individual rights protected by the First Amendment.
  • Explain the role of the First Amendment in current American life.


Newspapers, magazines, and TV and radio news are a big part of American society. And learning the “daily news” isn’t just limited to those sources anymore. Twitter, blogs, and other forms of online expression are constantly giving the American public information about what is happening in government, business, and society at large. Did you know that not all countries have this kind of press or media coverage? The U.S. news media is a direct result of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which you will explore in this experience.

Objectives:

  • Identify the individual rights protected by the First Amendment.
  • Explain the role of the First Amendment in current American life.




What are some of the ways that you express yourself online? To list more than one way, separate your ideas with a comma, like this: eat ice cream, drive a car

Post your answer

Discuss student responses, which might include reading and posting on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or Snapchat; posting to a blog or online school newspaper; creating videos for YouTube or Vimeo; and so on.


What rules apply to what you can and cannot express online?

Post your answer

Discuss student responses. They will learn more in this experience, so for now do not correct them. Instead, take note of their understandings and misconceptions about digital citizenship and rules for online expression.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

End of Preview
The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Foundations of American Government Unit.
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