The Amendment Process


Civics Foundations of American Government The Amendment Process
Students learn the process for amending the Constitution. Then they explain an amendment that was explicitly not allowed by the U.S. Constitution. Finally, they draw conclusions about why the Founding Fathers made it so difficult to amend the Constitution.

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Overview

In this experience, students learn the process for amending the Constitution. Then they explain an amendment that was explicitly not allowed by the U.S. Constitution. Finally, they draw conclusions about why the Founding Fathers made it so difficult to amend the Constitution.

Objective

  • Describe the Constitutional amendment process.


Even though the U.S. Constitution was written over two hundred years ago, it has remained central to the American government and society. Yet the need to make changes in the Constitution has arisen from time to time. In this experience, you will learn the process for changing, or amending, the Constitution.

Objective

  • Describe the Constitutional amendment process.
Look at the following panel from a cartoon published in 1909.




Arabella—  “No, Mr. Sniggsworth, much as I dislike to say it,
I cannot become your wife until women can vote.”


Click the panel to see the entire cartoon. Predict what you think the cartoon is trying to say. (Hint: Look at the title of the cartoon.)

Post your answer

The Library of Congress gives the following description: “Ralph Wilder’s cartoon shows a series of drawings in which a young man's proposal is rejected by his sweetheart until women can vote; he goes off to Washington, promising to return when he wins the vote for women; finally he returns, feeble, with beard falling to the floor, to admit defeat to his portly, mature lady.”

The underlying message is that the 19th Amendment to give women the right to vote would take a very long time to achieve.


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