Guaranteeing Other Civil Rights


Civics Foundations of American Government Guaranteeing Other Civil Rights
Students learn about amendments to the Constitution that provide equal rights for minorities and special groups. First students define civil rights, and then focus on the Reconstruction Amendments. Then they learn about the women’s suffrage movement and draw a political cartoon related to the 19th Amendment. Next, they learn that the 24th and 26th Amendments helped more people gain voting rights. Finally, students draft their own amendment related to civil rights.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Guaranteeing Other Civil Rights:

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about amendments to the Constitution that provide equal rights for minorities and special groups. First, students define civil rights and then focus on the Reconstruction Amendments—the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Then they learn about the women’s suffrage movement and draw a political cartoon related to the 19th Amendment. Next, they learn that the 24th and 26th Amendments helped more people gain voting rights. Finally, students draft their own amendment related to civil rights.

Objectives

  • Explain how other amendments to the Constitution expanded the civil rights of Americans.
  • Identify the terms of the Reconstruction Amendments—the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments.
  • Identify important events throughout the women’s suffrage movement and how it led to the 19th Amendment.
  • Explain how the 24th and 26th Amendments improved voting rights. 




Barack Obama Voting in 2012


Any person who is a U.S. citizen and at least 18-years-old can vote in U.S. elections. Did you know that this was not always the case? When the United States had its first presidential election in 1789, only white men who owned property could vote. Since then, the Constitution has been amended several times to change that rule. In this experience, you will learn about those amendments.

Objectives

  • Explain how other amendments to the Constitution expanded the civil rights of Americans.
  • Identify the terms of the Reconstruction Amendments—the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments.
  • Identify important events throughout the women’s suffrage movement and how it led to the 19th Amendment.
  • Explain how the 24th and 26th Amendments improved voting rights.
Americans have certain rights just by being citizens of the United States. These are called civil rights. The U.S. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, protects people’s rights in our country.


What are some rights that U.S. citizens have? As a class, try to list as many rights as you can. If someone has already posted your idea, try to think of a different right. 





Possible answers:

  • The right to vote in elections
  • Freedom of speech
  • Freedom of religion
  • Jury of your peers


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