The Federal System


Civics The Federal Government The Federal System
Students learn how the federal system of government in the United States allows the national government and the state government to share power. Then they explain federalism as a principle of American government. Then they consider how some laws vary in different states and argue for or against a state law.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for The Federal System:

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Overview

In this experience, students learn how the federal system of government in the United States allows the national government and the state government to share power. Then they explain federalism as a principle of American government. Then they consider how some laws vary in different states and argue for or against a state law.

Objectives:

  • Explain how the federal system limits the national government.
  • Describe how the federal system allows the national government and state governments to share power.


Did you know that in South Dakota you can get your driver’s license when you are 14 years old, but in Connecticut you can’t get a license until you are 17? Does that seem fair to you? Are you surprised that there isn’t a consistent age across the country to become eligible for a driver’s license? 




The reason for this situation is that some government powers belong to state governments and some government powers belong to the national government. This system in which the national and state governments share and divide powers is known as a federal system.

Objectives:

  • Explain how the federal system limits the national government.
  • Describe how the federal system allows the national government and state governments to share power.

Can you think of any laws that are different from state to state? For example, are there some laws in Florida that are different from laws in other states in the country?


List any laws that you can think of that are different from state to state.

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Some examples include: the death penalty is legal in some states, but it is illegal in most states; the sale of guns is stricter in some states than others; the use of marijuana is now legal in some states; assisted suicide for the terminally ill is legal in some states.

The Student Pack includes a link to an article Here Are The Most Ridiculous Laws In Every State. You may want to take a few minutes and let students read through some of these “interesting” laws.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene. 

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The Federal Government Unit.
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