Figurative Language


ELAR-Grade-6 Author's Craft Figurative Language
Students learn about figurative language that authors use to make their writing more entertaining and to enhance the images readers make in their minds as they read. They identify and write their own similes, metaphors, personification, and imagery. Finally, they write their own text that includes examples of figurative language.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Figurative Language:

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about figurative language that authors use to make their writing more entertaining and to enhance the images readers make in their minds as they read. They identify and write their own similes, metaphors, personification, and imagery. Finally, they write their own text that includes examples of figurative language.

Objectives

  • Recognize an author's use of figurative language: simile, metaphor, personification, and imagery.
  • Explain the purpose of figurative language.
  • Write a text with figurative language.

Duration

Two-three class periods. You may choose to have students read the texts at home before beginning the experience.

Students only read excerpts from “To Build a Fire” and “The Laurence Boy” (Chapter 3 of Little Women) for the experience. You may choose to have them read the entire text.

Vocabulary Words Used in This Experience:

“To Build a Fire”

  • intangible: unable to be touched or grasped
  • pall: cover
  • undulations: waves, crinkles
  • chechaquo: a newcomer
  • frailty: weakness
  • conjectural: hypothetical, imaginary
  • protruding: bulging

 “The Laurence Boy”

  • garret: attic
  • poplins: lightweight cotton
  • mortified: ashamed, embarrassed
  • blithely: happily
  • consolingly: lessen the grief or sadness
  • petulantly: grumpily
  • aristocratic: upper class
  • trifle: a little bit


In this experience, you will identify various types of figurative language including similes, metaphors, personification, and imagery, and explain why authors use it in their writing. You will also write your own text using figurative language.

Objectives

  • Recognize an author's use of figurative language: simile, metaphor, personification, and imagery.
  • Explain the purpose of figurative language.
  • Write a text with figurative language.


a bee on a flower

Busy as a bee


Have you ever heard the saying, “Busy as a bee”? The saying is not actually about hard-working bees. It means that someone is very active and energetic. This is an example of figurative language. Specifically, it is both a simile and an idiom.

Similes compare two things that are not alike. For example, you may have heard that something is light as a feather. Let’s see how well you know some other similes.



Ask students to share their answers with the class. If necessary, provide the correct answers to the similes.

Ask students if they think that the similes add meaning to the adjective. For example, does “as sick as a dog” tell them how sick someone is?


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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