A Nation Is Born


Social Studies American History American Revolution A Nation Is Born
Students share how they celebrate the Fourth of July. Then they learn about the Treaty of Paris and focus on a map showing the outcome of the Revolution. Next they are introduced to a group of Founding Fathers and write a short report about one of them. Finally, they reflect on what tasks faced the new nation.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Preview - Scene 1
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Overview

In this experience, students share how they celebrate the Fourth of July. Then they learn about the Treaty of Paris and focus on a map showing the outcome of the Revolution. Next they are introduced to a group of Founding Fathers and write a short report about one of them. Finally, they reflect on what tasks faced the new nation.

For the report in Scene 3, you can use the opportunity to teach students how to search effectively for information online or in the school library. There is a short article about the Founding Fathers in the Student Pack to help them get started.

Estimated duration: 40–60 minutes or several days, depending how much time you want to give students to research their reports

Vocabulary words:

  • celebrate
  • treaty
  • victorious
  • negotiation
  • dispute

Objectives

  • Explain the outcome of the War of Independence.
  • Identify key political figures of the American Revolution.


Engage


The Second Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. The War of Independence continued until 1781. The final peace treaty was signed in 1783. In this lesson, you will learn about the outcome of the War of Independence.

Objectives

  • Explain the outcome of the War of Independence.
  • Identify key political figures of the American Revolution.


a poster showing fireworks and a U.S. flag, with the text “4th of July, Independence Day”

How does your family celebrate the Fourth of July? Draw or upload a picture showing something that you like to do on Independence Day.


Give students a few minutes to complete and discuss the activity. Ask them to reflect on what they are celebrating—the founding of the United States as an independent country.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in American Revolution Unit.
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