Commonly Confused Words


English Language Arts Grade 7 The Writing Process
Students define commonly confused words and create a visual clue for remembering the usage. Then students write sentences with the words learned. Finally they edit a passage and correct the spelling and usage errors.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
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Here are the teacher pack items for Commonly Confused Words:

Preview - Scene 1
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Engage


Overview

In this experience, students define commonly confused words and create a visual clue for remembering the usage. Then students write sentences with the words learned. Finally they edit a passage and correct the spelling and usage errors.

Students will collaborate in small groups for Scene 2.

Objective

  • Distinguish and use commonly confused terms.

Duration

Two class periods.


The English language has many words that sound similar, are spelled almost the same, and are often confused in writing. In this experience, you will identify commonly confused terms in order to learn the appropriate usage of the words.

Objective

  • Distinguish and use commonly confused terms.


Chalkboard with the word there written in three ways: t-h-e-r-e, t-h-e-i-r, t-h-e-y-apostrophe-r-e

Try to read the following paragraph:


I cnduo't bvleiee taht I culod aulaclty uesdtannrd waht I was rdnaieg. Unisg the icndeblire pweor of the hmuan mnid, aocdcrnig to rseecrah at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno't mttaer in waht oderr the lterets in a wrod are, the olny irpoamtnt tihng is taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rhgit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it whoutit a pboerlm. Tihs is bucseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey ltteer by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Aaznmig, huh? Yaeh and I awlyas tghhuot slelinpg was ipmorantt! See if yuor fdreins can raed tihs too.


How much of the paragraph are you able to understand?

A) all of it
B) most of it
C) a little of it
D) none of it

Ask for a volunteer to read the paragraph aloud.

Explain to students that the human brain has an ability to decode a misspelled word as long as the first and last letters of the word are correct. This ability is called typoglycemia, a term that is itself a pun based on the words typo and hypoglycemia.


As you saw, correct spelling may not be essential for people to read your writing, but conventional spelling certainly makes it easier and reduces the risk that your reader will misunderstand your message.


Divide students into their small groups for the next scene. When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

End of Preview
The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The Writing Process Unit.
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