Reading Argumentative Text


ELAR-Grade-8 Non-fiction Texts Reading Argumentative Text
Students define the characteristics of an argumentative text, including audience, claim, evidence, counterargument, and rebuttal. Then students read a passage and analyze the argument made by the author. After identifying the characteristics and analyzing the evidence and counterarguments, students evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s argument.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Reading Argumentative Text:

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Overview

In this experience, students define the characteristics of an argumentative text, including audience, claim, evidence, counterargument, and rebuttal. Then students read a passage and analyze the argument made by the author. After identifying the characteristics and analyzing the evidence and counterarguments, students evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s argument.

Objectives

  • Identify and define the characteristics of an argumentative text.
  • Analyze the structure of argumentative texts and how it contributes to the effectiveness of the author’s argument.
  • Analyze and evaluate an argument made by an author.

Duration

Two to three class periods. Students will read several argumentative texts. You may have students read these articles before beginning the experience.

Vocabulary Words from “Inaugural Address by Nelson Mandela”

  • prosperity: being successful
  • inalienable: unable to be taken away
  • indignity: treatment that causes a person to be embarrassed or lose dignity
  • skunk: despicable
  • emancipation: process of being set free
  • chasm: large difference between people and their beliefs
  • deprivation: denial of something that is a necessity
  • pernicious: having a harmful effect
  • amnesty: official pardon for people who have committed a political crime


We are often faced with having to convince others to agree with us. Whether at school, at home, or with friends we often express our opinions and hope that others will agree. The likelihood of gaining support depends on the logic and strength of our arguments, including the support we offer for them. In this experience, you will explore how authors make arguments through writing.

Objectives

  • Identify and define the characteristics of an argumentative text.
  • Analyze the structure of argumentative texts and how it contributes to the effectiveness of the author’s argument.
  • Analyze and evaluate an argument made by an author.


cartoon of hand holding sign that says “What is your reason?”

Imagine your school is considering a new policy that requires students to wear uniforms, and you have been asked to represent your classmates in a meeting with the principal to discuss the issue. How would you get the principal to agree with your side?


Describe what you would say to your principal about school uniforms. How would you present your opinion to get the principal to listen to you?

Post your answer

Use student responses to discuss that an argumentative text is more than just an opinion. In order for our arguments (or opinions) to carry any weight, we must support them with reasons and evidence. The principal would need to hear more than your opinion to be persuaded to agree with you.


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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Non-fiction Texts Unit.
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