Irony


ELAR-Grade-8 Literary Genres Irony
Students view a cartoon and identify the humor in it, which stems from irony. Then, they learn about the three types of irony. Next, they read a classic short story and explain examples of irony in it. Finally, they brainstorm and write scenes that use irony.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Irony:

Preview - Scene 1
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Overview

In this experience, students view a cartoon and identify the humor in it, which stems from irony. Then, they learn about the three types of irony. Next, they read a classic short story and explain examples of irony in it. Finally, they brainstorm and write scenes that use irony.

Students will work together in small groups in scenes 3 and 4.

Objectives

  • Identify irony in texts.
  • Explain the purpose of irony.

Duration

One class period. You may choose to have students read the short story before beginning the experience.

Vocabulary Words Used in “The Cask of Amontillado”

  • avenged: got revenge; retaliated
  • vintages: wines
  • cask: barrel; a way of storing wine
  • perceive: notice, see, realize
  • excessive: too much
  • afflicted: distressed, troubled, as if by illness
  • insufferably: intolerably
  • gait: way of walking
  • endeavored: tried
  • implore: beg, plead with
  • surpassed: exceeded, outdid
  • masonry: something built of stone, brick, or concrete


“That’s ironic.” Have you ever heard that phrase? Perhaps you knew what it meant, or perhaps you were somewhat puzzled. Either way, this experience will help you understand more about what irony is—and how authors use it.

Objectives

  • Identify irony in texts.
  • Explain the purpose of irony.


Two identical cartoon women; one says, “I like you. You are different.” The other says, “You too.”

Look at the cartoon. Why is it humorous?

If you understand the cartoon, you are well on your way to understanding irony.


In one or more complete sentences, explain the cartoon.

Post your answer

Students should understand that the humor arises from the contradiction between what the two women say and what the picture reveals about them. Their opinion is that they are different, but the picture shows that they are identical. Probably—unknown to them—the real reason they like each other is because they are alike.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Literary Genres Unit.
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