Analyzing the Setting


ELAR-Grade-8 Literary Genres Analyzing the Setting
Students identify the setting of a photo of a county fair at night. Then, they read and respond to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story “The Minister’s Black Veil.” Next, they explain how setting relates to characters’ values and beliefs. Finally, they apply what they have learned to a story they know and like.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for Analyzing the Setting:

Preview - Scene 1
Exploros Learnign Experience Scene Navigation


Engage


Overview

In this experience, students identify the setting of a photo of a county fair at night. Then, they read and respond to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story “The Minister’s Black Veil.” Next, they explain how setting relates to characters’ values and beliefs. Finally, they apply what they have learned to a story they know and like.

Objectives

  • Identify the setting of a work of fiction.
  • Explain how the setting influences the characters’ values and beliefs.

Duration

One class period. You may choose to have students read the short story before beginning the experience.

Vocabulary Words in “The Minister’s Black Veil”

  • sexton: caretaker of a church
  • phenomenon: (1) any event or circumstance; (2) something unusual  
  • preceded: gone before
  • congregation: group of worshipers
  • withdrawn: taken away
  • tinged: colored slightly; tinted
  • polluted: made unclean or impure
  • spiritual: (1) having to do with the spirit; (2) religious
  • scandal: an event or condition that shocks the community
  • ambassadors: officials who are sent on a mission
  • convert: (1) to switch from one belief to another; (2) someone who converts from one belief to another
  • shunned: avoided
  • pious: having deep religious faith
  • aghast: horrified


The setting of a story is the time and place where it occurs. In this experience, you will find out how the setting can be critical to understanding the characters.

Objectives

  • Identify the setting of a work of fiction.
  • Explain how the setting influences the characters’ values and beliefs.


county fair at night

Not every country or culture has county fairs. In fact, county fairs are especially associated with one country and its culture: the United States. Even if you have never been to a county fair, there’s a good chance you have an image in your mind of what that cultural phenomenon is like.

A country fair, then, is a setting. It occurs in a particular time and place—for example, the Comal County, Texas Fair of 2018. Imagine that you are about to write a story set at a county fair. What would the setting include?


Write things that might be found in a story about a county fair. To list more than one, separate your ideas with a comma, like this: football, baseball

Post your answer

The takeaway for this activity is that setting influences fictional characters’ beliefs and values just as in real life. Tell students that in this experience, they will read a story whose setting, and the beliefs and values of the characters, are an important element of traditional American culture.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

End of Preview
The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Literary Genres Unit.
Would you like to preview the rest of this learning experience, and get access to the entire functioning ELAR Grade 8 course for your classroom? Sign up using your school email address below. Exploros OER is free for educational use.
Back to top