Figurative Language


ELAR-Grade-8 Author's Craft Figurative Language
Students learn about figurative language that authors use to make their writing more entertaining and to enhance the images readers make in their minds as they read. They identify and write their own extended metaphors, and also identify authors’ uses of imagery.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

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Here are the teacher pack items for Figurative Language:

Preview - Scene 1
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Overview

In this experience, students learn about figurative language that authors use to make their writing more entertaining and to enhance the images readers make in their minds as they read. They identify and write their own extended metaphors, and also identify authors’ uses of imagery.

Students will collaborate in small groups for Scene 2 and Scene 3.

Objectives

  • Recognize an author’s use of extended metaphors.
  • Explain the purpose of figurative language.
  • Write a text with an extended metaphor.

Duration

One to two class periods. You may choose to have the students read “After Twenty Years” at home before beginning the experience.

Vocabulary Words Used in “After Twenty Years”

  • stalwart: determined
  • plodder: slow-moving


In this experience, you will identify several types of figurative language, including similes and metaphors, and explain why authors use it in their writing. You will also identify the use of extended metaphor. Throughout the experience you will have the opportunity to use figurative language as you write your own text.

Objectives

  • Recognize an author's use of extended metaphors.
  • Explain the purpose of figurative language.
  • Write a text with an extended metaphor.


empty stage in a majestic theater

William Shakespeare wrote a famous speech called, “All the world’s a stage” in his comedy As You Like It.  The first lines are:


“All the world’s a stage,

And all the men and women merely players;

They have their exits and their entrances;

And one man in his time plays many parts,

His acts being seven ages…”


What two things is Shakespeare comparing?  What do you think he means? Write a few sentences to share your thoughts.

Post your answer

Ask a few volunteers to discuss their ideas. If necessary, explain the following to the students:

Shakespeare is comparing life to a stage. The actors on the stage are the people you meet. They come and go throughout your life, like the actors coming off and going on stage. Throughout life, the role you play will change.


Divide students into their small groups for the next two scenes. When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Author's Craft Unit.
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