Using Figurative Language


ELAR-Grade-4 Author's Craft Using Figurative Language
Students learn about different types of figurative language that authors use to make their writing more entertaining and to enhance the images readers make in their minds as they read. They identify and write their own examples of similes, metaphors, personification, alliteration, and assonance. Finally, they write their own text that includes examples of figurative language.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

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Here are the teacher pack items for Using Figurative Language:

Preview - Scene 1
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Overview

In this experience, students learn about different types of figurative language that authors use to make their writing more entertaining and to enhance the images readers make in their minds as they read. They identify and write their own examples of similes, metaphors, personification, alliteration, and assonance. Finally, they write their own text that includes examples of figurative language.

Students will collaborate in small groups for Scene 2 through Scene 5.

Objectives

  • Recognize an author's use of figurative language: simile, metaphor, personification, alliteration, and assonance.
  • Explain the purpose of figurative language.
  • Write a text with figurative language.

Duration

Two-three class periods. You may choose to have the students read “The Magic Mirror” before beginning the experience.

Vocabulary Words Used in the “The Magic Mirror”

  • vain: think too highly of oneself
  • compassion: a feeling of care or sympathy for someone
  • vexation: displeasure, annoyance


In this experience, you will identify various kinds of figurative language including similes, metaphors, personification, alliteration, and assonance. You will explain why authors use it in their writing. You will also have an opportunity to write your own text using figurative language.

Objectives

  • Recognize an author's use of figurative language: simile, metaphor, personification, alliteration, and assonance.
  • Explain the purpose of figurative language.
  • Write a text with figurative language.


A woman using her umbrella as a shield from a storm of cats and dogs

“It’s raining cats and dogs.”


Perhaps you have heard of the saying, “It’s raining cats and dogs!” This does not mean that cats and dogs are really falling from the sky! The image above shows the literal meaning of the words, but this phrase is an example of figurative language. Specifically, “it’s raining cats and dogs” is called an idiom, and it means it is raining very hard.

Read the following list of idioms, with the actual meanings in parentheses.

  • Speak your mind (say what you feel)
  • A piece of cake (very easy)
  • Slipped my mind (I forgot)
  • Cost an arm and a leg (very expensive)
  • Draw a blank (can’t remember)
  • Play it by ear (improvise; make it up as you go)
  • I’m all ears (I am listening)
  • Hold your horses (wait a moment)
  • Let the cat out of the bag (tell a secret)
  • Bee in her bonnet (talk about something non-stop)
  • Your goose is cooked (you’re in trouble)
  • A wolf in sheep’s clothing (a person who acts nice but is mean)
  • Cat’s got your tongue (someone quiet)
  • Like a fish out of water (feeling like you do not belong somewhere) 


What do you think the literal meaning of the idioms would look like? Illustrate the literal meaning of one of the idioms. You can create your illustration directly on the canvas below, or draw it on paper and upload a photo of it.


Have the students review the posts and provide positive feedback to one another on their images.

Ask: Why do you think people use idioms in their speech and writing instead of just literal language?


Divide students into their small groups for the next two scenes. When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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