Landmark Supreme Court Decisions


Civics The Judicial Branch: Justice and the Law Landmark Supreme Court Decisions
Students explore the landmark Supreme Court case of Brown v. Board of Education and analyze its significance. In small groups, they work to explore and analyze another landmark case and report back to the whole group. Finally, they consider how at least one of these cases has influenced their own life.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Landmark Supreme Court Decisions:

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Overview

In this experience, students explore the landmark Supreme Court case of Brown v. Board of Education and analyze its significance. In small groups, they work to explore and analyze another landmark case and report back to the whole group. Finally, they consider how at least one of these cases has influenced their own life.

Students will work in small groups in scene 3. Each group will research one of nine landmark decisions, so you should divide students into at least nine small groups.

Objective

  • Identify and analyze the significance and outcome of landmark Supreme Court cases.


You are probably familiar with several physical landmarks in the United States, such as the Statue of Liberty, the Grand Canyon, or Mount Rushmore. These physical landmarks literally “mark a point in the land.” They often represent something important in nature or history. Events in history can also be landmarks. The signing of the Declaration of Independence, for example, is one of the most critical landmarks in American history. In this experience, you will learn about some landmark decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court—decisions that mark an important achievement or change in American thinking or practice.

Objective

  • Identify and analyze the significance and outcome of landmark Supreme Court cases.




Linotype Operators at the Chicago Defender Newspaper


In 1954, a Supreme Court verdict came that caused a writer for the African American newspaper the Chicago Defender to say this about the decision:


“Neither the atom bomb nor the hydrogen bomb will ever be as meaningful to our democracy as the unanimous declaration of the Supreme Court that racial segregation violates the spirit and the letter of our Constitution.”


Think about what the quotation means. Then rewrite it in your own words.

Post your answer

Discuss student responses. Ask them to guess what the case was or what the core issues in the case were. Then tell them they will learn more about that case—Brown v. the Board of Education—in the next scene.​


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The Judicial Branch: Justice and the Law Unit.
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