Commonly Confused Words


English Language Arts Grade 8 The Writing Process
Students define commonly confused words and create a visual clue for remembering the usage. Then students write sentences with the words learned. Finally they edit a passage and correct the spelling and usage errors.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for Commonly Confused Words:

Preview - Scene 1
Exploros Learnign Experience Scene Navigation


Engage


Overview

In this experience, students define commonly confused words and create a visual clue for remembering the usage. Then students write sentences with the words learned. Finally they edit a passage and correct the spelling and usage errors.

Students will collaborate in small groups for Scene 2.

Objective

  • Distinguish and use commonly confused terms.

Duration

Two class periods.


The English language has many words that sound similar, are spelled almost the same, and are often confused in writing. In this experience, you will identify commonly confused terms in order to learn the appropriate usage of the words.

Objective

  • Distinguish and use commonly confused terms.


a pineapple with pink sunglasses and a flower in her “hair”

Mrs. Malaprop said a woman was the pineapple of politeness
(instead of the pinnacle of politeness)


Mrs. Malaprop was a character in the 1775 play The Rivals by Richard Sheridan. Poor Mrs. Malaprop often mixed up her words, and she is so famous for using the wrong word that the mistake is named after her—a malapropism! Read the following malapropisms:

  • She’s as headstrong as an allegory on the banks of the Nile.
    – Mrs. Malaprop in The Rivals, by Richard Sheridan
  • Already I was heavy-hearted in my soul for the flush commodes and machine-washed clothes and other simple things in life I have took for granite.
    – Rachel in The Poisonwood Bible, by Barbara Kingsolver
  • The law I sign today directs new funds... to the task of collecting vital intelligence... on weapons of mass production.
    – President George W. Bush, 2002
  •  [We] understand the importance of bondage between a mother and child.
    – Vice President Dan Quayle, 1988
  • We have to deal seriously with this offense as a detergent to others.
    – Real-life example from Richard Lederer’s Verbivore
  • If you wish to submit a recipe for publication in the cookbook, please include a short antidote concerning it.
    – Real-life example from Richard Lederer’s Verbivore


Choose one of the malapropisms in the list and explain it, or make up your own malapropism.

Post your answer

A malapropism is generally defined as the mistaken use of a word in place of a word that sounds similar, often with unintentionally humorous effect.

The confused words in the malapropisms given above are:

  • allegory for alligator
  • granite for granted
  • production for destruction
  • bondage for bonding
  • detergent for deterrent
  • antidote for anecdote


Divide students into their small groups for the next scene. When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

End of Preview
The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The Writing Process Unit.
Would you like to preview the rest of this learning experience, and get access to the entire functioning ELAR Grade 8 course for your classroom? Sign up using your school email address below. Exploros OER is free for educational use.
Back to top