Figurative Language


ELAR-Grade-7 Author's Craft Figurative Language
Students learn about figurative language that authors use to make their writing more entertaining and to enhance the images readers make in their minds as they read. They identify and write their own similes, metaphors, and personification. Finally, they write their own text that includes examples of figurative language.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for Figurative Language:

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about figurative language that authors use to make their writing more entertaining and to enhance the images readers make in their minds as they read. They identify and write their own similes, metaphors, and personification. Finally, they write their own text that includes examples of figurative language.

Objectives

  • Recognize an author's use of figurative language: simile, metaphor, and personification.
  • Explain the purpose of figurative language.
  • Write a text with figurative language.

Duration

Two class periods. You may choose to have the students read “The Golden Beetle or Why the Dog Hates the Cat” at home before beginning the experience.

Vocabulary Words used in This Experience:

“Beclouded”

  • diadem: a jeweled crown

“The Railway Train”

  • prodigious: extraordinary
  • supercilious: condescending
  • docile: quiet
  • omnipotent: invincible

“The Golden Beetle or Why the Dog Hates the Cat”

  • scant: limited
  • pangs: twinges
  • alms: donations
  • millet: plant
  • solemnly: seriously
  • baubles: decorations


In this experience, you will identify many different types of figurative language including similes, metaphors, and personification. You will explain why authors use it in their writing. You will also write your own text using figurative language.

Objectives

  • Recognize an author's use of figurative language: simile, metaphor, and personification.
  • Explain the purpose of figurative language.
  • Write a text with figurative language.


cartoon eye with apple in pupil

The apple of my eye!


Have you ever heard the saying, “apple of my eye”? The saying is not actually about eyes and apples. It refers to someone who is very dear to you or perhaps the person you love most. This is an example of figurative language. Specifically, it is both a metaphor and an idiom.

Metaphors are tools authors use to comparisons to help readers create mental images. Metaphors are a type of analogy that compares one thing to another, highlighting how they are alike. Metaphors are similar to similes. The difference is that similes use the words like or as. For example, you may have heard that something is light as a feather. Let’s see how well you know some other similes.



Ask students to share their answers with the class.

Ask students if they think that the figurative language adds meaning to the phrases. For example, does “as easy as pie” tell them how easy something is?


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Author's Craft Unit.
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