Emergence and Migrations of Early Humans


Social Studies Middle School Emergence and Migrations of Early Humans
Students encounter the early peoples of the Paleolithic Era. They locate the physical geography of several places where prehistoric modern humans lived. Next, they explore major Paleolithic cultural developments such as language, art, and religion. They learn how archaeologists work to find evidence of prehistoric people. Finally, students investigate how early peoples’ adaptations to their environment enabled their survival, particularly during the Ice Age.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Emergence and Migrations of Early Humans:

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Overview

In this experience, students encounter the early peoples of the Paleolithic Era. They locate the physical geography of several places where prehistoric modern humans lived. Next, they explore major Paleolithic cultural developments such as language, art, and religion. They learn how archaeologists work to find evidence of prehistoric people. Finally, students investigate how early peoples’ adaptations to their environment enabled their survival, particularly during the Ice Age.

Objectives

  • Describe the migration patterns of early humans.
  • Describe how the earliest humans adapted to their environment in order to survive.
  • Describe the lifestyles of early hunter-gatherers, including fire and tools.
  • Identify ways that geography influenced early human cultural adaptations.


The first modern humans arose in East Africa more than 100,000 years ago. In this experience, you will learn where and how those early peoples lived.

Objectives

  • Describe the migration patterns of early humans.
  • Describe how the earliest humans adapted to their environment in order to survive.
  • Describe the lifestyles of early hunter-gatherers, including fire and tools.
  • Identify ways that geography influenced early human cultural adaptations.




Prehistoric Cave Painting


Look at the image of the cave painting above. What do you see? In a short phrase, share an idea with your classmates. To list more than one, separate your ideas with a comma, like this: Rome, Paris

Post your answer

Discuss students’ responses.


The world’s first artists lived long before there were farming, writing, or cities. Paintings and drawings like the one above have been found in caves and on rocks in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Often, these artists painted the animals that they saw around them. They painted predators and prey. Also, they made prints of their own hands. Perhaps the handprints were like signatures!

To see more photos of cave art and learn how they were made, read Cave Painting. Click the yellow camera icon to see more cave pictures. Click the information links, too. 


Based on what you have learned, what is a question you have about the earliest humans?



Discuss students’ questions. Highlight several for students to focus on as they move through the rest of the experience. For example, where did the earliest humans live? What did they eat? How did they travel?


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Early Humans and the Agricultural Revolution Unit.
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