The Spread and Influence of Judaism


Social Studies Middle School The Spread and Influence of Judaism
Students learn about the contributions of Judaism to Western civilization. First, they learn about the Second Temple period, and they build a brief timeline of major events during the periods of the two Holy Temples. Then, they learn about the rise of Judaism and they contrast it with the ancient Israelite religion. Finally, they learn about major concepts of Judaism and how Judaism has influenced other cultures and religions, and they evaluate how passages from Judaic sources reflect these concepts.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for The Spread and Influence of Judaism:

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about the contributions of Judaism to Western civilization. First, they learn about the Second Temple period, and they build a brief timeline of major events during the periods of the two Holy Temples. Then, they learn about the rise of Judaism and they contrast it with the ancient Israelite religion. Finally, they learn about major concepts of Judaism and how Judaism has influenced other cultures and religions, and they evaluate how passages from Judaic sources reflect these concepts.

Students will collaborate in small groups for scene 2 to scene 4.

Objective

  • Describe the spread and influence of Judaism.


Did you know that the idea of a weekend stems from the Ten Commandments, which require a day of rest once a week: “Keep the Sabbath day holy”? Or that many of the gospels sung by slaves in the pre-Civil War United States are based on words from the Hebrew Bible? In this experience, you will learn about some of the ideals and traditions that Judaism passed to Western civilization.

Objective

  • Describe the spread and influence of Judaism.




The Jewish Sabbath was commanded in the Ten Commandments;
it led to the concept of a weekend.


Look at the Israel Timeline. The early dates are approximate; no one knows for sure what year Abraham arrived in Canaan or when the Hebrews first went to Egypt—or if these are even historical events.


Choose an event from the timeline, and then try to think of a historical event that was happening elsewhere in the world at about the same time. For example, the Ottoman Empire conquered Israel and Jerusalem in 1517 C.E., about the same time that the early European explorers were making expeditions to the “New World.”



When history is broken into neat geographic units, students often miss the bigger picture of how events might interconnect, or which events happen simultaneously in different regions. Throughout each unit it is useful to help students see when the events they are learning about occur parallel to events from other units. For example, the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt occurred during the reign of Ramses during the New Kingdom period.


Now list a question that you have about Judaism and its contributions to Western civilization.



You can use one or more of the students’ questions as guiding questions for the experience. If any questions are left unanswered by the end of the experience, encourage students to research the answers and share them with the class.


Divide students into their small groups for the next three scenes. When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Ancient Israelites Unit.
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