Book Report (Non-fiction)


ELAR-Grade-7 Non-fiction Texts Book Report (Non-fiction)
Students choose a non-fiction book to read and explain why they chose it. Next, they use pre-reading strategies to make predictions and ask questions. Then they read the book and monitor comprehension by completing graphic organizers. After reading, they evaluate the book with post-reading strategies. Finally, they write a book report, rate the book, and create a new cover for it.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for Book Report (Non-fiction):

Preview - Scene 1
Exploros Learnign Experience Scene Navigation


Engage


Overview

In this experience, students choose a non-fiction book to read and explain why they chose it. Next, they use pre-reading strategies to make predictions and ask questions. Then they read the book and monitor comprehension by completing graphic organizers. After reading, they evaluate the book with post-reading strategies. Finally, they write a book report, rate the book, and create a new cover for it.

Students should read a non-fiction text for this experience. You can let students self-select the text. You may want to assign a general subject area (geography, biography, science, etc.) that ties in with other subjects being studied in the classroom. Having books on hand for students to choose from or making a trip to the library might be helpful.

Note that there is a complementary experience in the Literary Genres unit. Either experience can be used multiple times throughout the school year for students to submit a book report via Exploros.

Objectives

  • Choose an appropriate non-fiction book and read it.
  • Write a book report for the book.

Duration

Assign the experience for the duration of the time period that students have from selecting a book to completing reading and writing the book report.


What strategies do you use when you read? Good readers use a variety of strategies before, during, and after reading. Good readers think about what they read, questions they have about the text, and predictions they are making. In this experience, you will select a non-fiction book to read and create a book report for your classmates, sharing your opinion about the book and information you learned.

Objectives

  • Choose an appropriate non-fiction book and read it.
  • Write a book report for the book.


student reading a book

Once you know which book you will be reading for this book report, answer the following questions:

  1. State the title and author of the book you have selected.
  2. Describe what you think the book will be about in a sentence or two. (Use the back of the book, insert, or Internet to help you write your description.)
  3. Describe the genre of your book. Explain how you know it falls into that genre.
  4. In a sentence or two, explain why you chose this book to read.

Post your answer

As needed review non-fiction genres in order to help students identify the genre of their book.

Review each student’s book selection in order to make sure it is appropriate based on requirements you set and the student’s reading level.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

End of Preview
The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Non-fiction Texts Unit.
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