Canada: Government and Economy


World Cultures North America Canada: Government and Economy
Canada: Government and Economy

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for Canada: Government and Economy:

Preview - Scene 1
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Overview
In this experience, students are introduced to Canada Day and watch a celebration. They explore what defines a limited, constitutional monarchy. Then they compare the differences between the Canadian and U.S. federal governments. Finally, they focus on what they have learned by developing a quiz for classmates.
 
Students will collaborate in small groups for scene 4.
 
Objectives:
  • Identify Canada’s government as a limited, constitutional monarchy.
  • Describe the elements of the Canadian parliament.
  • Compare the Canadian and U.S. federal governments.


On July 1 every year, Canadians celebrate Canada Day in honor of the Constitution Act in 1867, which created the Canadian federal government, making it an independent dominion of Great Britain. In this experience, you will explore the government of Canada that was established as a result of that act.




Objectives:
  • Identify Canada’s government as a limited, constitutional monarchy.
  • Describe the elements of the Canadian parliament.
  • Compare the Canadian and U.S. federal governments.
 
Watch the video:


Why do you think people celebrate their countries and say an oath of citizenship? What is the equivalent in the United States?

Post your answer

Guide students in discussing national allegiance as a concept. For some, this may be a nuanced concept, as they may not feel any real loyalty or patriotism to a country. Remind them that in the United States, July 4th is the day we celebrate our nation.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in North America Unit.
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