Citizenship and Representative Governments


World Cultures Government and Economics Citizenship and Representative Governments
Students review the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution. Then they consider what citizenship is and explore the rights and responsibilities that are part of U.S. citizenship. Next, they research and then compare and contrast the rights and responsibilities of citizens in another country with those in the U.S. Finally, students choose what they think the most important rights and responsibilities should be for "global citizenship."

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Citizenship and Representative Governments:

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In this experience, students review the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution. Then they consider what citizenship is and explore the rights and responsibilities that are part of U.S. citizenship. Next, they research and then compare and contrast the rights and responsibilities of citizens in another country with those in the U.S. Finally, students choose what they think the most important rights and responsibilities should be for “global citizenship.”

Objectives:

  • Define and describe the rights and responsibilities in representative societies.
  • Describe and compare the role and responsibilities of U.S. citizens with other countries.


Has anyone in your family ever said to you, “As a member of this family, you have a responsibility to help out”? Maybe you were being asked to take out the garbage or to watch a younger sibling. Countries—not just families—ask their citizens to help the country run by taking up certain responsibilities. You will learn about these responsibilities in this experience.

Objectives:

  • Define and describe the rights and responsibilities in representative societies.
  • Describe and compare the role and responsibilities of U.S. citizens with other countries.




What is a right? Give a short definition or an example in the table below.



Discuss student responses.


What do you know about the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution? List a fact in the table below. If someone has already listed your fact, try to think of a different one to post.





Review what students already know about the Bill of Rights, and note any misconceptions.


You probably had some great ideas about the Bill of Rights, but you may not have remembered everything about it. Review what it contains by watching A 3-Minute Guide to the Bill of Rights.


Which of the following rights are addressed in the first amendment of the Bill of Rights? Choose all that apply.

A) freedom of speech
B) freedom of the press
C) freedom of religion
D) freedom to assembly

The Second Amendment is the right to bear arms. What was the original purpose for that amendment?

A) to protect American colonists from armed British soldiers
B) to build the gun and weapons business in the colonies 
C) to keep one’s family members out of one’s house
D) to show social status by how many guns one had

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Government and Economics Unit.
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