Drafting and Signing the Constitution


US History The U.S. Constitution Drafting and Signing the Constitution
Students learn about the first stages of the U.S. Constitution—the debates behind the drafting and signing of this document. They'll discover when and why this document was written, the two main plans that were proposed for the nation's government, and the compromises that were reached before the delegates would sign the document.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Drafting and Signing the Constitution:

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about the first stages of the U.S. Constitution—the debates behind the drafting and signing of this document. They’ll discover when and why this document was written, the two main plans that were proposed for the nation’s government, and the compromises that were reached before the delegates would sign the document. (In the next experience, they’ll learn about its ratification—when the people of each state voted whether or not to accept the U.S. Constitution.)

Objectives:

  • Identify the leaders of the Constitutional Convention.
  • Compare the main differences between the two rival plans for the new Constitution.
  • Summarize compromises the delegates had to reach before the Constitution could be signed.


In this experience, you will learn about the first stages of the U.S. Constitution—the debates behind the drafting and signing of this document. You’ll discover when and why this document was written, the two main plans that were proposed for the nation’s government, and the compromises that were reached before the delegates would sign the document.

Objectives:

  • Identify the leaders of the Constitutional Convention.
  • Compare the main differences between the two rival plans for the new Constitution.
  • Summarize compromises the delegates had to reach before the Constitution could be signed.




U.S. Constitution


Today, the U.S. Constitution defines the nation’s government, fundamental laws, and basic rights of its citizens. This document was the outcome of much debate and compromise as the nation’s leaders drafted and signed it, and before it was ratified by the general public to become the official law of the land. 

The Constitution opens with the words, “We the People of the United States…” Think about this opening and how you might conclude it to reflect the essence of the nation’s government. 


Write a possible continuation of the sentence.

Post your answer

In replying to this writing challenge, students may refer to the revolutionary era or to current events.

The actual text reads:

WE THE PEOPLE of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

Students will study the content of the Constitution in a different experience. 


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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The U.S. Constitution Unit.
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