Pearl Harbor and U.S. Entry into the War


US History (11th) The United States and World War II Pearl Harbor and U.S. Entry into the War
Students learn the details of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the U.S. entry into the war against Japan, Germany, and Italy. Then, they follow the progress of American industry’s mobilization for the war and they evaluate the leadership of President Franklin D. Roosevelt in response to the war’s outbreak. Finally, they create a collage of primary source visuals about the mobilization.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for Pearl Harbor and U.S. Entry into the War:

Preview - Scene 1
Exploros Learnign Experience Scene Navigation


Engage


Overview

In this experience, students learn the details of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the U.S. entry into the war against Japan, Germany, and Italy. Then, they follow the progress of American industry’s mobilization for the war and they evaluate the leadership of President Franklin D. Roosevelt in response to the war’s outbreak. Finally, they create a collage of primary source visuals about the mobilization.

Objectives

  • Describe the effects of the attack at Pearl Harbor.
  • Describe domestic industry’s rapid mobilization for the war.
  • Analyze the leadership of Franklin D. Roosevelt.


After years of sitting out World War II, the United States finally entered it in December 1941. What happened to cause the United States to enter the war? You’ll learn the details in this experience.

Objectives

  • Describe the effects of the attack at Pearl Harbor.
  • Describe domestic industry’s rapid mobilization for the war.
  • Analyze the leadership of Franklin D. Roosevelt.




North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) Command Center,
Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colorado


Throughout human recorded history, there has always been a war somewhere on Earth. That’s true in the present, as it was during the lead-up to World War II. But then the United States was forced to enter an overwhelming, global conflict.


Can you name one or more countries that are currently at war? To list more than one, separate them with commas, like this: Rome, Paris

Post your answer

In the present day, what might it take for the United States to enter a global war? What events could trigger such a move? What evidence from history or the news supports your view?

Post your answer

Briefly discuss a few interesting responses. Possible responses include, but are not limited to:

  • a direct military or terrorist attack on the United States.
  • a devastating cyberattack on the United States
  • a direct military attack on a U.S. ally, such as a NATO member
  • escalating threatening behavior


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

End of Preview
The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The United States and World War II Unit.
Would you like to preview the rest of this learning experience, and get access to the entire functioning U.S. History HS course for your classroom? Sign up using your school email address below.
Back to top