Women’s Suffrage


US History (11th) Progressive Era Women’s Suffrage
Students view media about women’s suffrage marches to help analyze the lasting impact of women’s suffrage in the United States. Then, they examine the events, issues, and personalities of this movement. They work together in groups to create an infographic of the women’s suffrage movement and the impact of the 19th amendment. Finally, they view and interpret a popular women’s suffrage map from the Progressive Era.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Women’s Suffrage:

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Overview

In this experience, students view media about women’s suffrage marches to help analyze the lasting impact of women’s suffrage in the United States. Then, they examine the events, issues, and personalities of this movement. They work together in groups to create an infographic of the women’s suffrage movement and the impact of the 19th amendment. Finally, they view and interpret a popular women’s suffrage map from the Progressive Era.

Students will collaborate in small groups for scene 3.

Objective

  • Describe the events leading up to the passage of the 19th amendment.


Rights and privileges that we take for granted now have not always been available to all citizens. The achievement of women’s right to vote in 1920 is generally considered one of the great moments in the advancement of human progress in the United States. In this experience, you’ll learn how that right was won and who led the struggle for it.

Objective

  • Describe the events leading up to the passage of the 19th amendment.




Parade participant Rose Sanderson trumpeting for women’s suffrage, 1913


In this experience, you will see the word suffrage many times. Post a synonym for suffrage in the word cloud.

Post your answer

Use the word cloud as an indicator of student confidence about the meaning of suffrage.


Scroll through the photos at The Long Road to Women’s Suffrage.

On March 3, 2013—the 100th anniversary of the first women’s suffrage parade in Washington, D.C.—a large group of women reenacted the 1913 suffragette parade. Watch Women’s Suffrage March Reenactment to see the reenactment.


Why do you think people in 2013 chose to reenact the 1913 parade?

Post your answer

Discuss possible motivations with students:

  • The organizers wanted to celebrate a great achievement in women’s history and keep its memory alive.
  • By commemorating the 1913 parade, the organizers hoped to re-energize Americans to support women’s rights in the present.
  • Organizers wanted to protest that over a century later, women’s role in politics is still limited by gender bias.


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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Progressive Era Unit.
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