Soviet Aggression after World War II


US History (11th) Early Cold War Through Vietnam Soviet Aggression after WWII
Students investigate a series of landmark events that shaped the Cold War: the Berlin airlift, the Truman Doctrine, and the creation of NATO. Then, students use evidence to develop and support a point of view about the Truman Doctrine and NATO.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Teacher Pack

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Here are the teacher pack items for Soviet Aggression after World War II:

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Overview

In this experience, students investigate a series of landmark events that shaped the Cold War: the Berlin airlift, the Truman Doctrine, and the creation of NATO. Then, students use evidence to develop and support a point of view about the Truman Doctrine and NATO.   

Objectives

  • Describe Soviet aggression after World War II.
  • Explain the Truman Doctrine.
  • Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of NATO.


A period of political hostility referred to as the Cold War (because it did not break out into a global military “hot” war) lasted from right after the end of World War II to 1991, when communist governments fell in the Soviet Union and all across Eastern Europe. In this experience, you’ll learn how the Cold War began with the U.S. response to the Soviet Union’s aggression against other nations.

Objectives

  • Describe Soviet aggression after World War II.
  • Explain the Truman Doctrine.
  • Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of NATO.




Fence along the former border between East and West Germany


Would you like to learn about 45 years of history in less than three minutes? Here it is—and as you’ll see, it’s just a first taste. You’ll learn lots of the details throughout this unit, starting with this experience.

Watch Cold War Photo Story.


Based on the video, try to define or describe the Cold War.

Post your answer

Select one or more interesting or exemplary responses as discussion starters. Wrap up by observing that the Cold War is a large subject, requiring a whole unit, and that this experience begins with the earliest events in Cold War chronology.

For interested students, the experience-wide video, How Is the Cold War Taught to Students in Russia Today?, included in the Student Pack, could be used here or after scene 4 to teach historiography. Different nations, as well as different historians within each nation, interpret the Cold War through their own perspectives. Students can view the video and then evaluate Sergei Khrushchev’s historical perspective. 

Note the following:

  • Sergei Khrushchev is the son of the Cold War leader of the Soviet Union, Nikita Khrushchev. An engineer, Sergei held a responsible post in the Soviet Union’s missile and spacecraft development program. He immigrated to the United States after the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991 and became an American citizen.
  • The interview took place in 2007. Since then, Russian leader Vladimir Putin has increased his autocratic power over Russia, including its press and education.


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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Early Cold War Through Vietnam Unit.
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