The Government and the Individual Citizen


US History (11th) Contemporary America The Government and the Individual Citizen
Students watch a video of a protest march and share their immediate responses. Then, they learn about four methods of participatory democracy and brainstorm ways to use them around a specific contemporary issue. Next, they analyze the issue of entitlement programs. Finally, they examine the issue of government seizure of private property.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for The Government and the Individual Citizen:

Preview - Scene 1
Exploros Learnign Experience Scene Navigation


Engage


Overview

In this experience, students watch a video of a protest march and share their immediate responses. Then, they learn about four methods of participatory democracy and brainstorm ways to use them around a specific contemporary issue. Next, they analyze the issue of entitlement programs. Finally, they examine the issue of government seizure of private property.

Students will work in small groups in scene 2 to brainstorm methods of citizen participation in contemporary public issues. Each group will cover one of five topics, so ensure that there are at least five groups.

Objectives

  • Identify and analyze recent examples of participation in the democratic process.
  • Discuss the solvency of government entitlement programs.
  • Evaluate the role of the Fifth Amendment in compensation for government seizure of private property.


Democracy thrives when individuals are active participants. Citizen participation in the democratic process reflects our national ethos (our set of beliefs), expresses patriotism, and builds civic responsibility. It helps us establish a “more perfect union.” In this experience, you’ll see a number of ways individuals make their views heard in American democracy today.

Objectives

  • Identify and analyze recent examples of participation in the democratic process.
  • Discuss the solvency of government entitlement programs.
  • Evaluate the role of the Fifth Amendment in compensation for government seizure of private property.




Black Lives Matter protest march in Minnesota, 2015


Have you ever participated in a protest march? If not, you’ve probably heard about them and seen them on the news. Watch the three short protest march video clips at Hundreds Arrested in Peaceful Protest as Thousands March Demanding “Clean” Dream Act.


What was your first reaction to the videos? Write words or brief phrases that describe your reaction. To write more than one, separate them by a comma, like this: tall, short.

Post your answer

Ask for volunteers to share their reactions. Point out that some people instinctively like protest marches and others are instinctively repelled by them. 


How do you think protest marches are related to the democratic process?

Post your answer

Public protest is one of the four types of civic participation that you will explore in this experience.


Divide students into their small groups for the next scene.

Assign each group one of the following issues:

  • police treatment of African Americans
  • prejudice against Muslims
  • climate change
  • tax reform
  • medical care
When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

End of Preview
The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Contemporary America Unit.
Would you like to preview the rest of this learning experience, and get access to the entire functioning U.S. History HS course for your classroom? Sign up using your school email address below. Exploros OER is free for educational use.
Back to top