Texan Response to the U.S.-Mexican War


Texas History Early Statehood Texan Response to the U.S.-Mexican War
Students identify the terms of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo. Then, they analyze issues that plagued Texas after the war, including slavery and the Texas border. Finally, they evaluate who benefitted most from the Compromise of 1850—the North or the South.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

1:1 Devices
Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for Texan Response to the U.S.-Mexican War:

Preview - Scene 1
Exploros Learnign Experience Scene Navigation


Engage


Overview

In this experience, students identify the terms of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo. Then, they analyze issues that plagued Texas after the war, including slavery and the Texas border. Finally, they evaluate who benefitted most from the Compromise of 1850—the North or the South.

Objectives:

  • Describe the outcomes of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo.
  • Explain the political issues faced by Texas leaders after the U.S.-Mexican War.
  • Identify what Texas gave up and what it gained through the Compromise of 1850.


The Mexican War lasted for two years. The Texas Rangers played a role in the war. Some were scouts for the army, while others were recognized for their bravery and leadership skills. Other Rangers struggled to follow the orders of the U.S. Army, and some even attacked Mexican villages with no reason.

The United States first won battles in Texas and then moved onto Mexico territory. The troops moved west, winning major battles along the way until they reached Mexico City, the capital. The fighting ended on September 14, 1847.




Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Cover


Mexico was reluctant to work out a peace treaty, but Mexican officials finally met with Nicolas Trist, a U.S. diplomat, to discuss the terms of a treaty. The U.S.-Mexican War officially ended on February 2, 1848 with the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo. 

In this experience, you will learn about the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo and the Compromise of 1850.

Objectives:

  • Describe the outcomes of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo.
  • Explain the political issues faced by Texas leaders after the U.S.-Mexican War.
  • Identify what Texas gave up and what it gained through the Compromise of 1850.


Recall what you know about the causes of the U.S.-Mexican War and the outcome of the war. Based on what you know, what do you think was one of the terms of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo?



Ask for a few volunteers to explain their predictions.


When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

End of Preview
The Complete List of Learning Experiences in Early Statehood Unit.
Would you like to preview the rest of this learning experience, and get access to the entire functioning Texas History MS course for your classroom? Sign up using your school email address below.
Back to top