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Treaties of Velasco

Two Treaties of Velasco signed by the Republic of Texas’ temporary government and Santa Anna, the Mexican dictator and commander of forces, after his capture at the Battle of San Jacinto.

A public version of the treaty was published immediately after it was signed. A second secret treaty was to be implemented after the public treaty was fulfilled. The secret treaty immediately released Santa Anna in exchange for his recognition of Texas as an independent nation.

However, the treaties were soon ignored by both sides. The Texas army blocked Santa Anna's promised release. Meanwhile, the Mexican government declared that anything Santa Anna promised while a prisoner was cancelled.

Treaties loosely established Texas' southern border at the Rio Grande River, but this issue was not resolved until 1848—after Texas statehood and the conclusion of the Mexican-American War.

Articles of the public agreement:

  1. General Antonio López de Santa Anna agrees that he will not take up arms, nor will he encourage them to be taken up against the people of Texas, during the present war of Independence.
  2. All fighting between the Mexican and Texan troops will stop immediately.
  3. The Mexican troops will leave the Territory of Texas.
  4. The Mexican Army in its retreat will not take any property without the owner’s agreement and payment.
  5. All private property, including cattle, horses, and slaves that were captured by the Mexican army shall be returned to the Commander of the Texan army.
  6. The troops of both armies will avoid contact with each other.
  7. The Mexican army will march quickly.
  8. This agreement will be sent to the Texan generals.
  9. All Texan prisoners will be released together in return for a matching number of Mexican prisoners. They will be treated with humanity.
  10. General Antonio López de Santa Anna will be sent to Veracruz as soon as possible.

David G Burnet

Ant. Lopez de Santa Anna

Etc.


Source: Treaties of Velasco
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