The Boston Massacre


US History The Revolutionary Era The Boston Massacre
Students explore the Boston Massacre. They watch a video and read two short descriptions for background information, then answer questions about the event. Next, they analyze a lithograph by Paul Revere and compare it to the facts they learned. Finally, students consider the reasons for Revere's depiction and reflect on the accuracy of historic images.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Overview

In this experience, students explore the Boston Massacre. They watch a video and read two short descriptions for background information, then answer questions about the event. Next, they analyze a lithograph by Paul Revere and compare it to the facts they learned. Finally, students consider the reasons for Revere’s depiction and reflect on the accuracy of historic images.

Objective:

  • Summarize the significance of the Boston Massacre.


British soldiers had been stationed in Boston since 1768 to enforce Britain’s legislative acts. About 4,000 troops were stationed in Boston, a city of only about 20,000. On March 5, 1770, British troops killed five colonists and injured six others. The event would later become known as the Boston Massacre. In this experience, you will learn more about this event, then study an engraving by Paul Revere that shows his interpretation of the event.

Objective:

  • Summarize the significance of the Boston Massacre.




Old State House, site of the Boston Massacre


This lesson focuses on the Boston Massacre. Complete this sentence: When I hear the word “massacre,” I think of…

Post your answer

Students may suggest words or phrases such as “mass murder,” “people being killed in a cruel way,” “slaughter,” or “bloodbath.” If students are unsure of this word’s meaning, suggest they look up “massacre” in the dictionary. As you discuss student answers, you could emphasize two aspects of the word “massacre”: that it involves killing many people, and that it is done in a violent, cruel manner.

Students will return to this question at the end of this activity, and they will evaluate if the Boston Massacre was indeed a massacre.


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