The Era of Good Feelings and The Missouri Compromise


US History The Early Republic The Era of Good Feelings and The Missouri Compromise
Students learn about James Monroe's first term in office during the "Era of Good Feelings." Then, they read about the Missouri Compromise of 1820. Finally, students complete a map of the slave and free states at the time of the Missouri Compromise.

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about James Monroe’s first term in office during the “Era of Good Feelings.” Then, they read about the Missouri Compromise of 1820. Finally, students complete a map of the slave and free states at the time of the Missouri Compromise.

Objectives:

  • Explain the significance of regional differences during the Era of Good Feelings.
  • Describe the impact of the Missouri Compromise.


When James Monroe ran for President in 1816, he won easily. Monroe’s Democratic-Republican Party was very strong at the time and the Federalist Party was losing support across the country. James Monroe was a popular man who had fought in the Revolutionary War under George Washington’s command and studied law with Thomas Jefferson. Monroe was the last of the Founding Fathers to serve as President.

Objectives:

  • Explain the significance of regional differences during the Era of Good Feelings.
  • Describe the impact of the Missouri Compromise.




James Monroe, painted by Samuel Morse


After Monroe was elected, he traveled extensively throughout New England speaking to the American public. During a speech in Massachusetts, a Boston newspaper called Monroe’s reception the start of an “Era of Good Feelings.”


What do you think this statement means?

Post your answer

Review your classmates’ posts and respond to at least two of them with a question or a positive comment.


Share an interesting or exemplary answer to the class for discussion.

Explain to students that in Monroe’s inaugural speech, he referred to the “present and happy condition of the United States” and “the happy government under which we live.”

These comments, along with the general feeling of the country at the time, inspired the newspaper to comment on the “era of good feelings” across the country.


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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The Early Republic Unit.
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