Monroe’s Domestic Policies


US History The Early Republic Monroe's Domestic Policy
Students learn about the domestic issues that existed during James Monroe's Presidency, including the banking crisis and Panic of 1819. Then, students read about how the banking crisis led to the landmark Supreme Court case of McCulloch v. Maryland. Finally, students explore the case further and evaluate the two major constitutional issues that were raised in the case.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about the domestic issues that existed during James Monroe’s Presidency, including the banking crisis and Panic of 1819.  Then, students read about how the banking crisis led to the landmark Supreme Court case of McCulloch v. Maryland. Finally, students explore the case further and evaluate the two major constitutional issues that were raised in the case.

Students will collaborate in small groups for scene 2 to scene 4. Scene 4 requires at least three students per small group.

Objectives:

  • Identify the causes and effects of the Panic of 1819.
  • Explain how the Supreme Court under John Marshall expanded federal power.




James Monroe Commemorative Coin


Objectives:

  • Identify the causes and effects of the Panic of 1819.
  • Explain how the Supreme Court under John Marshall expanded federal power.

When James Monroe became President, the country was expanding westward and there was a general feeling of optimism as the country experienced an economic boom. This time in history was called the “Era of Good Feelings” because the general feeling in the country was positive.

During this time, Americans were celebrating their victory against the British in the War of 1812, the further expansion of the United States, and increased manufacturing and industrial growth. The economy was growing and the transportation revolution was going strong. Most importantly, America was finally independent from British rule.

Think about how the “Era of Good Feelings” compares with the political and economic atmosphere today. 


What “name” would you give to the period of time we are currently living in?

Post your answer

Discuss with students some of the answers and why they selected those responses.


This “Era of Good Feelings” would not last long as the country’s economy began to falter and America was led into its first major depression – the Panic of 1819.


Divide students into their small groups for the next three scenes. When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The Early Republic Unit.
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