Marbury v. Madison


US History The Early Republic Marbury vs. Madison
Students learn about the significance and effects of the Supreme Court case of Marbury v. Madison. Then they evaluate key Supreme Court cases that have been determined using the power of judicial review.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Marbury v. Madison:

Preview - Scene 1
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Overview

In this experience, students learn about the significance and effects of the Supreme Court case of Marbury v. Madison. Then they evaluate key Supreme Court cases that have been determined using the power of judicial review.

Student will collaborate in small groups for scene 2 through scene 4.

Objective:

  • Describe the significance and effects of Marbury v. Madison


John Marshall was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court by John Adams in 1801. As Chief Justice, Marshall was responsible for leading the business of the Supreme Court and establishing the role it played within the federal government.

One of Marshall’s most important cases was Marbury v. Madison. In determining the decision on this case, Marshall declared that the Judiciary Act of 1789 was unconstitutional. This was the first time that the Supreme Court had ruled a law unconstitutional.

Objective:

  • Describe the significance and effects of Marbury v. Madison




John Marshall, U.S. Chief Justice


What do you think it means when someone says a law is “unconstitutional”?

Post your answer

Briefly discuss student responses to ensure that they understand a law that contradicts something prescribed in the U.S. Constitution is unconstitutional and may be overturned by the Supreme Court. Students will revisit the concept of checks and balances in scene 3.


Divide students into their small groups for the next three scenes. When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The Early Republic Unit.
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