The Emancipation Proclamation


US History The Civil War The Emancipation Proclamation
Students learn about the Emancipation Proclamation and its effects. Then they read passages from the proclamation and discuss its effectiveness in freeing southern slaves.

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about the Emancipation Proclamation and its effects. Then they read passages from the proclamation and discuss its effectiveness in freeing southern slaves.

Objective

  • Describe the purpose of the Emancipation Proclamation and its effects.


In September of 1862 following the Union victory at the Battle of Antietam, Abraham Lincoln delivered the Emancipation Proclamation. This presidential proclamation changed the course of the war and defined the cause as a “new birth of freedom.”

Objective

  • Describe the purpose of the Emancipation Proclamation and its effects.




The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863


What was the Emancipation Proclamation? First, let’s break the name down into its parts. Look up the word emancipation.


List a synonym for “emancipation.”

Post your answer

Now look up the word proclamation.


Write a sentence using the word “proclamation.”

Post your answer

Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862, and it took effect on January 1, 1863. Think about the historical context of Lincoln’s presidency.


Whom do you think Lincoln was emancipating?

A) Union soldiers
B) Confederate soldiers
C) Slaves
D) Prisoners of war

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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in The Civil War Unit.
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