The “New South”


US History Reconstruction Era and the Western Frontier The "New South"
Students learn about the ideals introduced during the "New South" era. They identify improvements in industry, manufacturing, and production in the post-reconstruction South. Then they research and prepare a report about the effects of the "New South" era on a specific southern state.

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about the ideals introduced during the “New South” era. They identify improvements in industry, manufacturing, and production in the post-reconstruction South. Then they research and prepare a report about the effects of the “New South” era on a specific southern state.

Objective:

  • Identify industries that flourished in the “New South.


Henry W. Grady, the editor of the Atlanta Constitution, believed that the South could rebuild itself to become even stronger and more vibrant than it had been before the Civil War. In 1886, Grady gave a speech in New England where he shared his vision for a “New South,” which would include economic stability based on agriculture as well as industry.




Henry W. Grady


Objective:

  • Identify industries that flourished in the “New South.”
In this speech, Grady said “The new South presents a perfect democracy, the oligarchs leading in the popular movement—a social system compact and closely knitted, less splendid on the surface, but stronger at the core—a hundred farms for every plantation, fifty homes for every palace—and a diversified industry that meets the complex need of this complex age.”


What do you think Grady meant in this quote?



Students answers will vary and may include that Grady felt that in order to survive, the South must change from a purely agricultural society supported by slave labor to a society that included farming as well as industry.


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