The Abolitionist Movement


US History Life Before the Civil War The Abolitionist Movement
Students learn about the origins of the abolitionist movement and the role of movement leaders, including Fredrick Douglass. Then, students study other abolitionists and report on their contribution to this important movement.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Teacher Pack

The Pack contains associated resources for the learning experience, typically in the form of articles and videos. There is a teacher Pack (with only teacher information) and a student Pack (which contains only student information). As a teacher, you can toggle between both to see everything.

Here are the teacher pack items for The Abolitionist Movement:

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about the origins of the abolitionist movement and the role of movement leaders, including Fredrick Douglass. Then, students study other abolitionists and report on their contribution to this important movement.

Students will collaborate in small groups for scene 2 to scene 4. In scene 4, groups will research one of eight abolitionists. If you want to ensure that all eight people are covered, divide students into at least eight small groups.

The teacher pack contains an optional video, The Meaning of July 4th for the Negro, which you may choose to project for the class.

Objectives:

  • Describe the historical development of the abolitionist movement.
  • Explain the roles of Frederick Douglass and others in the abolitionist movement.
  • Describe the different points of view of interest groups on abolition.




Jigsaw Puzzle Supporting the Emancipation of Slaves


Inspired by the Second Great Awakening and fueled by support in the North, the abolitionist movement started to take hold throughout the United States in the 1830s. This movement called for immediate freedom for all slaves and the end of slavery in America.

Objectives:

  • Describe the historical development of the abolitionist movement.
  • Explain the roles of Frederick Douglass and others in the abolitionist movement.
  • Describe the different points of view of interest groups on abolition.

For Americans today, it is easy to understand the motives of the abolitionists and the abolitionist movement. But, what about those who were opposed to ending slavery? What were their arguments for maintaining this practice?


Why did people support the institution of slavery?

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Discuss with students some of their responses. Explain to students that many people, primarily in the South, advocated for keeping their slaves for a number of different reasons. Many felt that the southern economy would collapse without the slave labor to help with the cotton crops. They also felt that the institution of slavery was their God-given right since the Bible mentions slaves. Also, white plantation owners and others felt that the white race was superior to the African-American race. They believed that if slaves were released, they would riot and cause an uprising.

In the North, factory owners were concerned that ending slavery might end their supply of cotton for the textile mills.


Divide students into their small groups for the next three scenes. When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.

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