The Great Awakening


US History European Colonization The Great Awakening
Students learn about the First Great Awakening, its impact on colonial society, and it role as a long-term cause of the American Revolution. They are introduced to Jonathan Edwards, George Whitefield, and Phillis Wheatley.

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about the First Great Awakening, its impact on colonial society, and its role as a long-term cause of the American Revolution. They are introduced to Jonathan Edwards, George Whitefield, and Phillis Wheatley.

Objective:

  • Describe the causes of the Great Awakening and its effects on colonial society.


Religion was a shaping force for most of the original thirteen colonies, each with its own history. In the mid-eighteenth century, a religious revival began to spread across the colonies, and it had a major impact on colonial society. Today, we call this movement the First Great Awakening, to distinguish it from the Second Great Awakening, a similar movement that arose a century later.

Objective:
  • Describe the causes of the Great Awakening and its effects on colonial society.




George Whitefield, an actor who became an evangelical preacher
in the Great Awakening


When I think of the word “awakening,” I think of…

Post your answer

If one or more students post the word “revival,” ask them to explain a connection between awakening and revival. If no one posted “revival,” mention the word and ask students if they know what it means in the context of evangelism.


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The Complete List of Learning Experiences in European Colonization Unit.
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