Life in the Republic of Texas


Texas History Revolution and the Texas Republic Life in the Republic of Texas
Students learn about daily life in the Republic of Texas. They describe how people received land grants as payment for their army service or as immigrants to Texas and how many people became farmers or ranchers. They explore how towns developed across the state and identify changes in education and religion during this time period. Then they analyze the Ashworth Act and the status of free African Americans in the Republic of Texas. Finally, they write a letter from a teen newly arrived in Texas to family "back home," describing their daily lives.

This learning experience is designed for device-enabled classrooms. The teacher guides the lesson, and students use embedded resources, social media skills, and critical thinking skills to actively participate. To get access to a free version of the complete lesson, sign up for an exploros account.

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Here are the teacher pack items for Life in the Republic of Texas:

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Overview

In this experience, students learn about daily life in the Republic of Texas. They describe how people received land grants as payment for their army service or as immigrants to Texas and how many people became farmers or ranchers. They explore how towns developed across the state and identify changes in education and religion during this time period. Then they analyze the Ashworth Act and the status of free African Americans in the Republic of Texas. Finally, they write a letter from a teen newly arrived in Texas to family “back home,” describing their daily lives.

Students will collaborate in small groups for scene 2 and scene 3.

Objectives:

  • Compare life for Texans living on farms, on ranches, and in towns.
  • Explain how the establishment of the Republic of Texas brought religious freedom to Texas.
  • Explain the status of free African Americans after the Texan Revolution.


After the Runaway Scrape, many Texans returned to their homes to find them destroyed or even burned down. They had to rebuild their communities. The Constitution of 1836 helped them by granting land to many people who lived in Texas before the Texan Revolution.

Study a document from 1838. Focus on page 2.


Something is being granted to a soldier who served in the Texan army. What did he receive for his service?



He received 916 acres of bounty land, which was set aside by the nation as payment for military service.


In this experience, you will learn about life in the Republic of Texas.

Objectives:

  • Compare life for Texans living on farms, on ranches, and in towns.
  • Explain how the establishment of the Republic of Texas brought religious freedom to Texas.
  • Explain the status of free African Americans after the Texan Revolution.




Bedroom of the Parker Cabin at Log Cabin Village Museum, Fort Worth
The cabin was built in approximately 1848.


In 1836, when Texas first gained its independence from Mexico, the population was around 50,000 people. By the time Texas became a state in 1846, the population had grown to nearly 100,000 people.


In a word or short phrase, suggest what people were looking for when they immigrated to Texas.

Post your answer

Possible answers may be:

  • Land
  • Jobs
  • Family
  • Fresh start


Divide students into their small groups for the next three scenes. When everyone is ready to continue, unlock the next scene.


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